What Everyone Ought To Know About Autism and Noise Sensitivity

“Sudden loud noises hurt my ears – like a dentist’s drill hitting a nerve…High-pitched continuous noise, such as bathroom vent fans or hair dryers,are annoying.I have two choices: 1) turn my ears on and get deluged with sound or 2)shut my ears off.”  Temple Grandin, article, An Inside View of Autism. This thread on Wrong […]

autism and noise sensitivity

Is “High Functioning Autism” Useful, or Not?

No great advance has been made in science, politics, or religion without controversy. Lyman Beecher. If the quote above is true, then we have room for advancing our understanding of the term, “high functioning autism“, given the amount of controversy the term generates! I ran across this article about a month ago, called “What’s the Difference […]

high functioning autism debate

Do Autistics Want/Need Relationships?  Unequivocally, Yes!

This is a guest article from Jenny Palmioto, LMFT, owner of Love and Autism, a love and autism conference addressing autism and relationships.

With autism awareness month now a few months behind us- family members, individuals on the spectrum and those that work in the field are likely no more ‘aware’ then they were prior to April. Undoubtedly, the media subjugated and captivated America with stories of families with children on the spectrum. The news featured doctors and parents discussing the newest “devastating” number of children diagnosed with ASD (1 in 68), the ongoing vaccine controversy, and treatment options from the traditional to the obscure. There were news stories with children on the spectrum biting, punching and kicking, looking at the camera with vacant stares, or sitting on the sidelines as other children play. Certainly, there was media coverage of savant individuals on the spectrum that have incredible gifts such as eidetic memories and virtuoso musical talent. This media representation of children with autism as mentally retarded, aggressive loners whom do not wish for relationships is developed to satisfy the viewer’s desires to understand something that is incredibly complex. This depiction of autism is inaccurate and wounding; causing a stigma and irrevocable damage to those on the spectrum and their families.

As a professional who works directly with the autism community, the version of autism that the media depicts is far narrower than the diversity of people whom I have the privilege to work with on a daily basis. Likely the most devastating myth that I hear about individuals with autism, is that “people on the spectrum” do not want or need relationships. The most worrisome part of this falsehood is when loved ones and individuals on the spectrum start to believe this debilitating myth. It is crucial and long overdue that we discard this limiting belief. Relationships define lives, everyone’s lives. Our primary goal in life is to love and be loved; this does not change when you are born with neurological differences associated with autism. Love is an innate and fundamental part of being human.

Many people struggle to find love and trusting relationships; some of those people have a diagnosis called autism. The diagnostic criteria for autism include social deficits as one of the three hallmarks of the disorder. However, the core deficit in interpersonal relationship does not mean that there is not a desire or longing to connect with others. Individuals on the autism spectrum want and need relationships at all phases of their lives.

New research shows the bi-directionality of autism, meaning that when an infant that later becomes diagnosed with autism interacts with his mother, he is more withdrawn, responding less to his mother’s attempts to interact and then, in turn, the mother’s interactions become more directive and less responsive/sensitive. The early relational disturbances that mark the parent-child relationship for those on the spectrum frequently extends over the course of life with difficulties in developing friendships and later intimate partnerships. Regardless, individuals on the spectrum feel the same emotional longing to belong and to be a part of something special at home, on the playground, in working/professional relationships, or as part of a team. The problem becomes: how can individuals on the autism spectrum get the closeness they want and deserve?

The ability to give and receive love is far more than a social skill that can be learned; it takes perseverance, reflection, risk, and trust. Our brains are experience dependent organisms, meaning that an individual has to experience relationships rather than simply learn about them in isolation. Professionals working with individuals with autism need to begin by understanding the neuro-science of attachment and love. It is essential that autism professionals do more than stop aberrant behaviors. We need to make sure that our interventions and methods have relationships as the primary focus. Relationship building cannot be secondary to behavioral skills training. Developing the “we” is important from the first moment of life and thus should also be central within our treatment options for those on the spectrum. Fulfilling reciprocal relationships are not only possible for all individuals on the spectrum, they are imperative to living a full and satisfying life.

If you are interested in finding out more about how to help your child, spouse, sibling, or loved one on the spectrum develop rewarding relationships, please join us at Love and Autism: A Conference with Heart on August 23-24th 2014. We know you will LOVE this event.

More details on our website at www.loveandautism.com.

Date:
Event: Love and Autism Conference
Topic: Love and Autism Conference
Public: Public

Improving Communication Skills – Who Can Help?

Good Help Is Hard To Find – My Blogging Story I’ve been blogging almost seven years. Last year I wanted someone to help me take my blogging to the next skill level. Through the years, I signed up for different learning opportunities based on promises the course teacher provider. Unfortunately, I didn’t always pay too […]

improving communication skills

aspergers relationshipsI believe that you deserve a place to belong.

I believe that you deserve relationships where you can be your whole self, your real self, the self that doesn’t have it all figured out, the self that makes mistakes, the self that hates itself sometimes. I believe that you deserve people who will see your whole self and accept you wholeheartedly.

I believe that within you is the spark of the divine, that your screw ups and your baggage do not have the power to define you, that no matter what you think of yourself and no matter the names that others have called you, you are overflowing with beauty and passion and potential.

I believe that it is good that you are alive, and that your life is a gift to the people who love you and to the people who have not met you yet but who will love you one day.

Dan Wendler, Improve Your Social Skills, Manifesto

photo credit: Adam Foster | Codefor via photopin cc