TWAP14: A Very Late Adult Aspergers Diagnosis

Philip Wylie Talks About His Personal Journey

Philip Wylie, A Very Late Adult Aspergers Diagnosis, and More

I’m excited for you to meet today’s guest: He’s Philip Wylie, author of Very Late Diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome, and Psychobiography of a Systemiser.

adult aspergers philip wylie

He’s an important voice among Asperger adults diagnosed late in life.

His story can encourage you, if you’ve also been diagnosed later in life, and I hope this podcast interview and his books will become part of a mighty lever that will move stereotypes and bigotry into awareness and acceptance of neurodiverse people.

Philip Wylie always knew he was different. He just never knew why.

He spent lots and lots of time and money trying to figure himself out, until the age of 51, using every therapy under the sun.

Along his intensive journey of personal growth, he received clues that would lead him, ultimately, to discover Aspergers syndrome.

Philip trained as a holistic personal development facilitator at Richmond-upon-ThamesCollege, London in year 2001/2002.

He says, about this training:

This excellent training ignited my interest in Carl Gustav Jung while I was designing my own mandalas using geometry.

He previously worked as Finance Director and Company Secretary of a British offshore bank, before locating to Thailand, where he has lived for the past twelve years.

Philip has brought a lifetime of experience with him today to deliver insights as an Aspergers adult to you. He’ll share his diagnostic journey, how a diagnosis of Aspergers changed his life, how he systemized his life as he did for his psychobiography, and about a developmental model he has developed, called the Nine Degrees of Autism.

A fun fact – Philip’s idea of Nirvana:

Driving my motorbike through the countryside, enjoying the natural wonders of the world, enjoying stimulating conversation, good music and indie movies.

Are you ready to be inspired, challenged, and stretched? Let’s go!

In this episode you’ll learn:

  • The clues that led Philip to his discovery of Aspergers
  • The pros and cons of receiving an Aspergers diagnosis, and Philip’s suggested middle path about disclosing your Aspergers diagnosis
  • How Philip systemized his life
  • Why it’s so important for parents of children with autism to look at their own personal neurology and ancestry.

And much more…

Links and Resources


Very Late Diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome: How Seeking A Diagnosis In Adulthood Can Change Your Life, by Philip Wylie

philip wylie psychobiography

 

 

 

 

Psychobiography of a Systemiser, by Philip Wylie

In early 2012, Philip received a pre-diagnostic assessment from Sara Heath of Autonomy (UK) after a one hour Skype interview / evaluation. In 2013, he obtained a formal diagnosis from a psychiatrist who consults for the UN in Asia.

Here is a link to The Nine Degrees of Autism, Philip’s next book which is in process. Philip has shared this book proposal with Dr. Luke Beardon at SHU and he recognized it as being a valid developmental model for autism and other hidden neurological conditions.

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I'm Steve Borgman. I'm a licensed clinical professional counselor and blogger committed to bringing you hope, understanding, and solutions that you can apply to your life immediately.

Are you tired of feeling alone, like you're the only one in this world? Please join the Thrive with Aspergers Community to connect with others just like you!

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • philipwylie

    Thanks Stephen for helping me spread my word, and thanks everyone else for listening to me – some say my natural Aspie style is quite direct and challenging for some people. Please bear in mind that every autistic person has unique traits (strengths and weaknesses) and our diagnostic journeys are different too.

  • George Anderson

    Phillip,
    I applaud what you are doing for Aspies. I am an Emotional Intelligence Coach for “disruptive physicians”. I am currently coaching one medical student and one surgeon who are both undiagnosed but clearly suffering from aspergers.
    I would like your thoughts about the value of skill enhancement in emotional intelligence a tool for this population.

  • George, thanks for your thoughts. Often, people with Aspergers are very emotionally tuned in and sensitive, but just have difficulty decoding what others are really thinking and feeling: kind of like face blindness.

    Philip, I wonder about your thoughts on this topic?

  • Philip Wylie

    Hello George.

  • Philip Wylie

    Hello George

    Thanks for your post.

    First, I think it’s important to be aware that people on the spectrum tend to
    have less cognitive empathy (so we find it hard to read other peoples’ minds)
    but usually much more affective empathy than NTs (so we cannot tolerate cruelty
    to anyone).

    Many people on the spectrum compensate for their lack of cognitive empathy by
    developing their intuition. This is what I did.

    Of course it’s possible to mimic high EQ people by looking at people in their
    eyes, smiling at people, and saying things that make people feel good. However,
    the danger with this approach is that it can lead to manipulation; for example,
    using flattery to get dates or charming people to satisfy selfish agendas.

    However, if you have any technique which could help autistic people identify abusers
    and bullies who have devious agendas, that would be really valuable!

    Best wishes

    Philip

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  • Tyn Llidiart

    I would love to know who that psychiatrist is who consults for the UN in Asia, and how one might be referred to her/him. I’m 60, undiagnosed and also in Thailand

  • Hi, Tyn, I’m doing some research to see what I can find for you 🙂